Lone Wolf Not So Lonely?

Lone wolf not so lonely? It now appears that contrary to popular image, lone wolves are very much a part of the pack dispersal arsenal that wolves, as a species, use to create new breeding pairs, as well as new territories. David Mech has documented “dispersers” creating new territories even within their original one, although that seems to be the exception. It is more common for “floaters,” as they are called to wander large distances, as much as 4,100 square miles, looking for a mate and a new area to call home. When they do stay close to home, they visit territory edges, “hoping” to meet a mate and an area large enough to create a new pack. There are no guarantees, according to Mech, though the majority of loners in one study did find mates and subsequently bred successfully. The more we know about wolves, the more fascinating they become.

 

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